Published by Beka Watts


Chance meeting means healing for Gali

by on Wednesday, January 24, 2018 at 9:31 pm

“His father wants nothing to do with him because of his condition,” Gali’s mother tells us, her voice heavy with sadness. “[Gali’s father] will not give money for food or…

What Precious Can Do

by on Tuesday, May 2, 2017 at 6:28 pm

Things Precious can do: 1. Make requests about her needs, especially as they pertain to footwear, while offering a free tutorial on how to make the perfect duck face.  One…

The voice Cherilyn found

by on Wednesday, November 30, 2016 at 9:59 pm

The first two times I asked Cherilyn what happened on the day she broke her leg, she told me she didn’t really remember. Her face showed some of the emotions…

I won’t forget

by on Wednesday, February 4, 2015 at 8:00 am

It took less than 60 seconds of exchanging smiles with Agnes for her to start talking with me. She only spoke a little bit of English but used every word at her disposal to talk about Maureen, of whom she couldn’t be more proud. Soon, Agnes was holding my hand in the back of the ambulance, smiling and laughing and telling stories.

Then, she turned serious. “We are suffering,” she said. I looked back at her a bit confused because we were just talking about how happy she was now that Maureen was healed. I asked her to explain. She told me that they were hungry, that they needed food, and that they suffer.

A year of unforgettable stories

by on Friday, January 2, 2015 at 1:26 pm

There are only a dozen stories below, but there could have been hundreds. It’s been a truly incredible year for CURE, full of joys and challenges, and we hope you see that in each of these stories. We also hope you know that without your prayers and support, none of them would have been possible.

Clayton Kershaw visits CURE Dominican Republic

by on Friday, November 21, 2014 at 4:14 pm

We were honored to have Clayton, A.J., Brandon, and Brandon in for a visit to the Dominican Republic. From attending devotions to spending time with kids preparing for and recovering from surgery – as well as witnessing a surgery – to visiting the home of a child who had been healed at CURE, the group was able to see a wide range of what CURE does on a daily basis. It was encouraging for us to hear that throughout the course of the day, they saw the gospel being expressed through the work of CURE.

You are the light of the world

by on Wednesday, November 5, 2014 at 11:21 am

A lot of the kids we meet are familiar with darkness. It comes in a variety of forms: being hidden from sight, receiving abuse from relatives, feeling an acute sense of hopelessness that healing might be impossible. Darkness, literally and figuratively, is very real for kids with physical disabilities in the developing world. When I met Evelyn and Willy and heard their story, I saw what happens when light shines in the darkness.

When healing means freedom from hiding

by on Tuesday, September 30, 2014 at 9:15 am

If you met Lauri today, you might notice that he’s a little bit shorter than most 20-year-olds. After all, he’s a rapper whose stage name is “El Pitufo,” which roughly translates to “The Smurf.” Lauri was born with an inherited bone disorder that causes dwarfism, hence the nickname. But it wouldn’t take long to realize his stature bears no resemblance to his personality. If his height is dwarfed, his personality is anything but.

From attempted suicide to healing

by on Wednesday, July 2, 2014 at 10:56 am

Losing a child is the most traumatic experience a parent can endure. Imagine, then, a parent who didn’t just lose one child, he lost three. The loss wasn’t in one tragic moment, but spread out over the course of years: one, after another, after another.

A new name, a new life

by on Wednesday, January 15, 2014 at 10:15 am

Imagine being in labor for five days. When those days mercifully end, you expect to hold your newborn baby and feel a sense of joy that overrides the pain and exhaustion of childbirth. Instead, after five days of intense labor, your child arrives and the midwives run from the room, terrified. Your community calls you cursed. Your husband refuses to even discuss the baby. You believe you are being punished by God for reasons unknown. All because your child was born with a disability, one that will prevent him from standing, walking, and being “normal” in any way for the duration of his life.

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Chance meeting means healing for Gali

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