Posts tagged CURE Malawi


Chisomo means grace

by on Thursday, November 30, 2017 at 9:46 pm

Chisomo was one of CURE’s very first patients when BEIT CURE Malawi first opened its doors in 2002. Born with bilateral cavovarus foot, she had several operations throughout 2003 for…

I won’t forget

by on Wednesday, February 4, 2015 at 8:00 am

It took less than 60 seconds of exchanging smiles with Agnes for her to start talking with me. She only spoke a little bit of English but used every word at her disposal to talk about Maureen, of whom she couldn’t be more proud. Soon, Agnes was holding my hand in the back of the ambulance, smiling and laughing and telling stories.

Then, she turned serious. “We are suffering,” she said. I looked back at her a bit confused because we were just talking about how happy she was now that Maureen was healed. I asked her to explain. She told me that they were hungry, that they needed food, and that they suffer.

We are skin and bones with souls

by on Wednesday, January 14, 2015 at 2:25 pm

But somehow, a thousand turns in the road later, I end up at CURE Malawi. Initially I was dead set against it. Me, in a hospital, in Africa? Ridiculous. But then followed a week of sleepless nights spent thinking about photojournalism, travel, children, and doing-something-good. I was in. I would just figure out the photographing-surgery part when I got there.

A year of unforgettable stories

by on Friday, January 2, 2015 at 1:26 pm

There are only a dozen stories below, but there could have been hundreds. It’s been a truly incredible year for CURE, full of joys and challenges, and we hope you see that in each of these stories. We also hope you know that without your prayers and support, none of them would have been possible.

You are the light of the world

by on Wednesday, November 5, 2014 at 11:21 am

A lot of the kids we meet are familiar with darkness. It comes in a variety of forms: being hidden from sight, receiving abuse from relatives, feeling an acute sense of hopelessness that healing might be impossible. Darkness, literally and figuratively, is very real for kids with physical disabilities in the developing world. When I met Evelyn and Willy and heard their story, I saw what happens when light shines in the darkness.

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